North Carolina Regiments - Confederate

by Ralph Clark

13th Bn
Lt Arty
2nd NC Arty
36th NC Troops
McRae's Bn
NC Cav
1st Rgt
NC Cav
2nd Rgt
NC Cav
7th Rgt
NC Cav
2nd Bn
NC Jr Rsrv
2nd Bn
NC Infy
12th Rgt
NC Infy
16th Rgt
NC Infy
18th Rgt
NC Infy
22nd Rgt
NC Infy
29th Rgt
NC Infy
37th Rgt
NC Infy
38th Rgt
NC Infy
39th Rgt
NC Infy
42nd Rgt
NC Infy
58th Rgt
NC Infy
60th Rgt
NC Infy
64th Rgt
NC Infy

Thomas Legion NC Infy
Ector's Brigade of French's Division

The multi-volume series, North Carolina Troops, includes regimental and company histories and a few lines about every North Carolina soldier. It's my principal source for information about these units and soldiers. If you find something of interest here, don't forget to nag your local librarian to buy the set.

There is a North Carolina Regiments Web Site with a bibliography of regimental histories and links to web pages for North Carolina Infantry and Cavalry Regiment web pages.

13th Battalion NC Light Artillery

The battalion was organized November 4, 1863 from extra batteries of the 36th Regt. N C Troops (2nd Regt. N C Arty), the 40th Regt. N C Troops (3rd Regt. N C Arty), and a North Carolina company from the 12th Battalion Virginia Light Artillery. The various batteries assigned remained at their assigned stations; the regiment never assembled together in one place. Therefore, there is no regimental history of action - each battery has its own individual history.

2nd Regiment NC Artillery (36th NC Troops)

McRae's Battalion, NC Cavalry

There is an excellent page on the web for this unit, including a full roster.

1st NC Cavalry (9th NC Troops)

There is a page on the web for this unit, maintained by the modern re-enactors.

The regiment was organized August 12, 1861 at Camp Beauregard in Warren County, North Carolina. After receiving training there, in October the regiment was ordered on the 7th to Richmond, Virginia, and on the 22nd to Manassas Junction, Virginia. There it joined General J. E. B. Stuart;s Cavalry Brigade, and was assigned to picket duty near Centerville. Colonel Robert Ransom took twenty men from each company on a scouting mission November 26, 1861, and encountered enemy cavalry scouts at Vienna, Virginia, and drove them from the field. December 20, 1861 part of the regiment accompanied General Stuart's foraging expedition. In March 1862, General Joseph E. Johnston's army was moved from Manassas to a line near Fredericksburg. February 18, 1862 the 1st Cavalry Regiment had been ordered to Suffolk, Virginia. On March 22, they were ordered to return to the defense of North Carolina, and settled at Camp Ransom near Kinston, North Carolina.

Thereafter, the regiment joined the Army of Northern Virginia and participated in many battles, eventually surrendering at Appomattox Cout House April 9, 1865. There is a six page regimental history, and company rosters, in N C Troops.(1) After the war, one of the commanders, Rufus Barringer, wrote The First North Carolina, A Famous Cavalry Regiment.

2nd NC Cavalry (19th NC Troops)

7th NC Cavalry (69th NC Troops)

2nd Battalion NC Junior Reserves

2nd Battalion NC Infantry

12th NC Infantry

16th NC Infantry

Organized as 6th Infantry Regiment Volunteers at Raleigh on June 16, 1861, and assigned to Gilham's Brigade, Army of the Northwest, in which it participated in the battle of Cheat Mountain, September 12, 1861. Redesignated as the 16th Infantry Regiment on November 16, 1861, and assigned to Hampton's Brigade, Whiting's Division, Army of Northern Virginia. From June 1862 to May 1863, in Pender's Brigade of A. P. Hill's Division. From May 1863 until surrender at Appomattox Court House, April 9, 1865, the 16th served in Scales Brigade, Pender's / Wilcox's Division, 3rd Corps, Army of Northern Virginia.

I've bought a copy of "History of the 16th North Carolina Regiment in the Civil War" by George Henry Mills (Edmonston, pb, reprint 1992, orig. pub. 1897), 82pp, by mail for $11 from The Scholar's Bookshelf.

18th NC Infantry

There is a brief sketch of the history of the regiment online.

22nd NC Infantry

The unit was organized July 11 at Raleigh in Wake County with twelve companies as the 12th Infantry Regiment Volunteers. Original Companies C and D became respectively Co. A of the 28th and Co. A of the 26th Infantry Regiments before the regiment was first mustered in at Raleigh in the summer of 1861. Initially assigned to the Department of Fredericksburg and after October 1861 to Pettigrew's Brigade which went into Whiting's Division in the Department of Northern Virginia.

From June 1862 to May 1863, part of Pender's Brigade, A. P. Hill's Division, Army of Northern Virginia. Thereafter, in Scales' Brigade, Pender's / Wilcox's Division, 3rd Corps, Army of Northern Virginia. Surrendered at Appomattox Court House, April 9, 1865.

29th NC Infantry

Organized September 24, 1861, at Camp Patton at Asheville, under command of Col. R. B. Vance. Assigned to various brigades in the Department of East Tennessee until December 1862. Joining the Army of Tennessee, at the Battle of Murfreesboro (Stones River) they were in Rains' brigade of McCown's division of Kirby Smith's corps, serving in Hardee's corps. Brig. Gen. Rains was killed, and Col. Vance of the 29th assumed command of the brigade. After Gen. Bragg's army withdrew to Shelbyville, a reorganization left Col. Vance's brigade made up of the 29th and 29th NC Infantry Regts, 3rd Bn GA Infy and 9th Regt GA Infy.

May 12, 1863 the 29th and 39th NC were transferred to Gen. Joseph E. Johnston's army in Mississippi. The 29th NC was assigned to Wilson's, and after August 24, Ector's brigade of Walker's Division. Sept 19 and 20, 1863 at the battle of Chickamauga the 29th lost 80 men killed and wounded and 30 missing. Sept 22 the brigade was transferred to Gen. Johnston's army in Mississippi and assigned to French's Division. See the History of Ector's Brigade for the remainder of their service.

37th NC Infantry

38th NC Infantry

Organized January 17, 1862, and initially assigned to Department of North Carolina. From June 1862 to May 1863, part of Pender's Brigade, A. P. Hill's Division, Army of Northern Virginia. Thereafter, in Scales' Brigade, Pender's / Wilcox's Division, 3rd Corps, Army of Northern Virginia. Surrendered at Appomattox Court House, April 9, 1865.

39th NC Infantry

Organized May 19, 1862, from Coleman's Infantry Battalion and added companies, at Clinton, Tennessee. Assigned to Reynolds' Brigade, Department of East Tennessee, until December 1862. Thereafter, various brigades in the Army of Tennessee until May 1863, when it was assigned to Brig. Gen. E. McNair's Brigade, French's Division, in the Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana, under the command of Gen. Joseph E. Johnston. In Sept 1863 McNair's brigade was sent from Mississippi to reinforce Gen. Bragg's Army of Tennessee, where it was placed in Brig. Gen. Bushrod R. Johnson's Division, Maj. Gen. Simon B. Buckner's Corps at the Battle of Chickamauga.

Following the Battle of Chickamauga, McNair's Brigade rejoined Gen. Johnston's army at Meridian, Mississippi. It was placed again in French's Division, until February, 1864, when McNair's, later Reynold's brigade was attached to the Department, later Division, of the Gulf. From May 1864, the 39th NC was a part of Ector's Brigade, French's Division, in Polk's, later Loring's Corps, which joined the defense of Atlanta. See the History of Ector's Brigade for the remainder of their service.

42nd NC Infantry

There is a page on the web for this unit, including a regimental history.

Organized April 22, 1862, at Salisbury. Served within the state under command of the Department of North Carolina until April 1863. Assigned then to Martin's Brigade, which remained under the Dept. of N. C. until May 1864. In that month, the brigade was assigned first to Whiting's / D. H. Hill's Division, and then, as Martin's / Kirkland's Brigade, to Hoke's Division, both in the Department of North Carolina and Southern Virginia.

From May 17 to June 14, 1864, the brigade was engaged in the campaign at Bermuda Hundred, when General Butler's Union army got itself bottled up on a peninsula and isolated from the battles of Grant and Lee in Virginia.

Kirkland's Brigade remained in Hoke's Division for the remainder of the war, as the division was transferred through four commands. The division was present at the Battle of Cold Harbor June 1-3, 1864, and later, at the siege of Petersburg. On July 30, 1864, troops of General Hoke's Division were engaged in the Battle of the Crater. In December 1864, the division rejoined the Deptartment of North Carolina and was involved in the two battles for Fort Fisher. Transferred to Hardee's Corps and, finally, to 1st Corps, Army of Tennessee, with which it participated in the Battle of Bentonville March 19-21, 1865. General Joseph Johnston surrendered his army April 26, 1865, at Durham Station in Orange County, North Carolina.

58th NC Infantry

There is an excellent page on the web for this unit, including a roster.

60th NC Infantry

64th NC Infantry

Thomas Legion Infantry Regiment

There is a page on the web for this unit.


Notes and References

1. Louis H. Manarin, comp., North Carolina Troops 1861-1865 A Roster, Vol. II Cavalry (Raleigh, NC: State Department of Archives and History, 1968).

2. Jordan, Weymouth T. Jr., comp., unit histories by Louis H. Manarin, North Carolina Troops 1861-1865 A Roster, Vol.VIII Infantry 27th - 31st Regiments (Raleigh, NC: Division of Archives and History, 1981), p. 247.

3. Ingmire, Frances and Carolyn Ericson, Confederate P. O. W.'s - Soldiers & Sailors Who Died In Federal Prisons & Military Hospitals In The North - National Archives (1984), p. 93.

4. Jordan, Weymouth T. Jr., comp., unit histories by Louis H. Manarin, North Carolina Troops 1861-1865 A Roster, Vol. X Infantry 38th - 39th and 42nd - 44th Regiments (Raleigh, NC: Division of Archives and History, 1985), p. 121.